PocketWizard is proud to sponsor Hanson Fong and John Woodward Seminar Tour

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For the second year running, Hanson Fong and John Woodward are touring the USA for their Beauty and the Beast seminar tour, and we’re proud to be part of it. It’s a full day of learning (10am-6pm) for the amazing price of $79.99 (web) or $99 (at the door). Check out what you’ll learn:

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

Lighting Ratio Demonstrations
Metering Techniques
The Art of Posing Family Groups
The Wheel of Self-Assessment
Compositional Study Guide
Facial Analysis
Portrait, Glamour and Modified
Glamour Lighting Forms
Digital and the Power of Raw
Color Management and Its Importance
10 Basic Poses
Flow Posing

Register now! Here are the dates/locations:
7/30 Portland, OR
8/10 Waltham, MA
8/13 New York, NY
9/14 Indianapolis, IN
9/24 Grand Rapids, MI
9/28 Houston, TX
10/1 Los Angeles, CA
10/5 Nashville, TN

DIY Racing Stripes Down Under

I think this is a good example of Pocket Wizards “making the impossible possible.”  This isn’t the only way to take such a photo, but using Pocket Wizards gave me confidence that everything would come together as planned. 
To take this photo, I borrowed a Manfrotto suction cup (thanks Darren!) and attached that to the car.  I mounted a Nikon D3 to this, added a 14-24 f/2.8 lens and lined things up in situ.  Next I attached a Pocket Wizard under the camera and configured this to fire the camera on demand. I set this Pocket Wizard to Channel 1.  Another Pocket Wizard was mounted on the camera hotshoe, this one was set to Channel 2 and would send a signal at the close of the exposure to the in-car flashes.
I put a Nikon SB800 on the dash, added a 1/4 blue gel, and connected a Pocket Wizard set to Channel 2.  After some test exposures I shaped some cinefoil as a snoot to keep as much light as possible off the back of the steering wheel, as initially it was lighting it up in a way that drew too much attention to it. On the back seats, two SB800’s with a full cut of CTO gel on each, these flashes were aimed in a sort of cross-over pattern.  By now I had run out of Pocket Wizards so these flashes were set to SU-4 mode so that the optical slaves would trigger them as the SB800 on the dash fired.
Last but not least, I held a Pocket Wizard in my hand – set to Channel 1 – and activated the camera as I drove. 
Tripping my Pocket Wizard fired the camera on Channel 1, and the camera rear sync activated the hot-shoe mounted Pocket Wizard set to Channel 2 to fire the in-car flash – which in turn sent the slaved flashes on the back seat into operation. One camera, three flashes, and four Pocket Wizards (could have done with six PW’s, but the optical slave worked given everything was in close proximity and the ambient was low)
The SB800 on the dash was set to 1/64th and minus 2/3 power, and the back seat ones were both set to 1/32nd power. Exposure (after a little trial and error) was f/8 at 1/8th of a second (to get motion blur) and ISO 400.  Driving through a tunnel in Sydney provided great ambient light for the relatively slow exposure, the overhead fluorescent battens seemingly joining together to make the light streaks.

The inspiration for this photo came from a great picture that Joe McNally took of a NY Fire Truck (Joe later told me he was pleased he wasn’t on the road when I drove by firing

Strobes in my face!)

Big thanks to Jay Millar from Ensofoto in Australia, who shared the result of a personal project involving suction cups, flash, some PocketWizards, a camera and a moving car. We dig.

©Jay Millar

©Jay Millar

I think this is a good example of PocketWizards “making the impossible possible.”  This isn’t the only way to take such a photo, but using Pocket Wizards gave me confidence that everything would come together as planned. 

To take this photo, I borrowed a Manfrotto suction cup (thanks Darren!) and attached that to the car.  I mounted a Nikon D3 to this, added a 14-24 f/2.8 lens and lined things up in situ.  Next I attached a PocketWizard under the camera and configured this to fire the camera on demand. I set this PockeWizard to Channel 1.  Another PocketWizard was mounted on the camera hotshoe, this one was set to Channel 2 and would send a signal at the close of the exposure to the in-car flashes.

I put a Nikon SB800 on the dash, added a 1/4 blue gel, and connected a PocketWizard set to Channel 2.  After some test exposures I shaped some cinefoil as a snoot to keep as much light as possible off the back of the steering wheel, as initially it was lighting it up in a way that drew too much attention to it. On the back seats, two SB800’s with a full cut of CTO gel on each, these flashes were aimed in a sort of cross-over pattern.  By now I had run out of PocketWizards so these flashes were set to SU-4 mode so that the optical slaves would trigger them as the SB800 on the dash fired.

Last but not least, I held a Pocket Wizard in my hand – set to Channel 1 – and activated the camera as I drove. 

Tripping my PocketWizard fired the camera on Channel 1, and the camera rear sync activated the hot-shoe mounted PocketWizard set to Channel 2 to fire the in-car flash – which in turn sent the slaved flashes on the back seat into operation. One camera, three flashes, and four PocketWizards (could have done with six PW’s, but the optical slave worked given everything was in close proximity and the ambient was low)

The SB800 on the dash was set to 1/64th and minus 2/3 power, and the back seat ones were both set to 1/32nd power. Exposure (after a little trial and error) was f/8 at 1/8th of a second (to get motion blur) and ISO 400.  Driving through a tunnel in Sydney provided great ambient light for the relatively slow exposure, the overhead fluorescent battens seemingly joining together to make the light streaks.

The inspiration for this photo came from a great picture that Joe McNally took of a NY Fire Truck (Joe later told me he was pleased he wasn’t on the road when I drove by firing Strobes in my face!)

— Jay Millar

Thanks, Jay! If you’d like to read more, drop by Jay’s Flickr and join the conversation. Also be sure to drop by his main website at ensofoto.com and check out the rest of his work. Do you have a photo and a story you want to share? Shout it out – drop us a line at blog@pocketwizard.com.

PocketWizard Releases Latest Firmware for ControlTL(tm)

Hot, hot! It’s a press release!

 

 Elmsford, NY – July 9, 2009 – PocketWizard has released the latest ControlTL firmware update; version 4.300.  This update addresses several performance issues, especially with the Canon 5D Mark II camera and is recommended for all MiniTT1™ and FlexTT5™ owners.  To install this update, simply connect your product to the PocketWizard Utility and click “check for updates” under the “maintenance” tab.  If you do not have the Utility installed on your computer, it can be downloaded for free at http://www.pocketwizard.com/support/downloads
Key improvements in firmware version 4.300:
    * ControlTL system will “auto-detect” the 5D Mark II camera. Photographers that previously had to craft C.1 or C.2 settings precisely for the 5D Mark II now have more flexibility.  This also allows the system to use the optimized HSS settings without manually selecting the camera model in the PocketWizard Utility.
    * “Forced TTL Master Mode” is now the default setting.  This is the required setting for any flash on top of the camera mounted MiniTT1 or FlexTT5.
    * Calibration shot does not trigger flashes. Triggering the flash during the first calibration shot is not needed so it has been turned off to save a little battery life.
    * Overall system performance improvements.
For more detailed explanation please see the release notes posted on PocketWizard.com.
PocketWizard products are made by LPA Design, based in South Burlington, Vermont and sold by MAC Group in the USA and authorized distributors around the world. 
For more information: email info@pocketwizard.com 

Elmsford, NY – July 9, 2009 – PocketWizard has released the latest ControlTL firmware update; version 4.300.  This update addresses several performance issues, especially with the Canon 5D Mark II camera and is recommended for all MiniTT1™ and FlexTT5™ owners.  To install this update, simply connect your product to the PocketWizard Utility and click “check for updates” under the “maintenance” tab.  If you do not have the Utility installed on your computer, it can be downloaded for free at http://www.pocketwizard.com/support/downloads

Key improvements in firmware version 4.300:

    * ControlTL system will “auto-detect” the 5D Mark II camera. Photographers that previously had to craft C.1 or C.2 settings precisely for the 5D Mark II now have more flexibility.  This also allows the system to use the optimized HSS settings without manually selecting the camera model in the PocketWizard Utility.

    * “Forced TTL Master Mode” is now the default setting.  This is the required setting for any flash on top of the camera mounted MiniTT1 or FlexTT5.

    * Calibration shot does not trigger flashes. Triggering the flash during the first calibration shot is not needed so it has been turned off to save a little battery life.

    * Overall system performance improvements.

For more detailed explanation please see the release notes posted on PocketWizard.com.

PocketWizard products are made by LPA Design, based in South Burlington, Vermont and sold by MAC Group in the USA and authorized distributors around the world. 

For more information: email info@pocketwizard.com 

Shoot the Pig!

We got a GREAT recession-buster email this morning from Jaren Wilkey, Manager of BYU Photography. We liked it so much it almost felt like we were using Hypersync ourselves by posting it immediately!

Recently we were asked to shoot an illustration for a story on bankruptcy. They wanted something simple like a broken piggy bank with coins laying everywhere, but I thought that it would be a lot more fun to get a shot of a piggy bank as it was hitting the ground and breaking up into pieces. This turned out to be the perfect opportunity to use our new PocketWizard Mini TT1’s and Flex TT5’s which allowed us to achieve TTL and High Speed Sync with at 1/8000 a second.

1/8000 Sec F/5.6 ISO 400 - Photo by Mark A. Philbrick/BYU

1/8000 Sec F/5.6 ISO 400 - Photo by Mark A. Philbrick/BYU

Now that’s cool. Wanna see how it’s done?

See all of the images and read the full story.

Thanks for emailing us, Jaren (hint, hint, everybody else!)! Be sure to browse the rest of the UtahPhotojournalism.com website to get a taste of good community.

Video: Tony Donaldson and Clementine Ford

tony-donaldson-clemetine-ford-video

Tony sent us a link to a great video of his photo shoot with Clementine Ford for Curve Magazine.

I recently photographed actress Clementine Ford (“The L Word”, “The Young and the Restless”, also Cybill Shepherd’s daughter) for Curve magazine. I love working for Curve, they interview interesting people and give me the opportunity to create whatever images I feel like. I never see the interview first. And usually I don’t talk to the personality before the shoot, as it’s all done with their “people”.

Link – Tony asks for feedback – show him some love!